Seasonal fruits and vegetables grown in the fertile soil of Aotearoa

Find out what's in season and how to use it

We are proud to offer a great variety of fresh, organic produce grown in New Zealand. Varied weather patterns across our 2 islands provides an amazing variety of seasonal produce.

We support growers throughout New Zealand that have a passion for organically and the knowledge and experience to utilise their region to produce some of the most flavourful and healthy produce available.

Spring
Summer
Autumn
Winter
Broccoli
Broccoli

Broccoli has a long list of advantages, from its rich nutrient content and health benefits to its versatility in the kitchen. This cruciferous vegetable, easily claims superfood status, as a source of essential nutrients vitamins A, C, and K, minerals including calcium, potassium and iron, as well as antioxidants and a high fibre content. Broccoli can be eaten raw in salads, added to stir fries and pasta dishes, blended into soup, and even roasted into pure deliciousness. And don’t toss those broccoli stems! Use them to make broccoli ‘rice’, broccoli slaw, broccoli noodles, broccoli pesto, or simply use as you would the florets!

Cabbage – green
Cabbage – green

The green cabbage has a slightly sweet, mild taste, that is very versatile. Its crisp texture makes it ideal for shredding into salads or coleslaws. It can also be cooked, making it delicious in stir-fries or soups.

Cabbage – red
Cabbage – red

Red cabbage has a deep purple colour from the rich pigments called anthocyanins, a type of antioxidant. Red cabbage has a mildly peppery and earthy taste and a delightful crunchy texture. Its essential in coleslaw and can also be braised, baked, sauted and recently has been a featured star in sauerkraut.

Cauliflower
Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a very versatile vegetable. It can be eaten raw or steamed, roasted, grilled, mashed, used to make ‘rice’ or added to a pizza base. Cauliflower has a very mild flavour and has become popular to use in recipes to reduce the carbohydrate content, such as added to mac n cheese, used to make ‘rice’ or as a substitute for chips in nachos, or added to pizza bases. 

Courgette
Courgette

Courgettes are mild tasting, and take on the flavour of whatever it's cooked with. This makes them a very versatile ingredient, that can be added to just about anything, from Bolognese and Lasagne, to tacos and curries. Slide, dice or shred them into soups, pasta dishes, salads, and even chocolate cake! You can bake it, sauté it, BBQ it and make it into spiralised noodles.

Spinach
Spinach

Spinach is not only a versatile ingredient, it's also a very nutrient-rich one. Raw spinach has a mild, slightly sweet taste that can be refreshing in salad, pesto, smoothies and dips. Its flavor becomes more robust and bitter when cooked, so it's best used in recipes with strong flavours such as lasagne, bolognese, frittata or mexican dishes such as enchiladas or chilli. Spinach is second on the Dirty Dozen list, so chooose organically grown whenever possible.

Agria Potatoes
Agria Potatoes

Agria potatoes are a well-loved, great all-round potato. They have a yellow flesh that is firm, yet smooth, with a mild and earthy flavour.  Agria potatoes are considered a floury potato, which means they are low in water content and high in starch, giving them a dry, delicate texture. This makes them best suited for baking, mashing, frying, and roasting.  They are particularly great for making into chips and wedges. If your family eats a lot of potatoes, choosing organic potatoes is a great way to avoid a variety of pesticides.

Broccoli
Broccoli

Broccoli has a long list of advantages, from its rich nutrient content and health benefits to its versatility in the kitchen. This cruciferous vegetable, easily claims superfood status, as a source of essential nutrients vitamins A, C, and K, minerals including calcium, potassium and iron, as well as antioxidants and a high fibre content. Broccoli can be eaten raw in salads, added to stir fries and pasta dishes, blended into soup, and even roasted into pure deliciousness. And don’t toss those broccoli stems! Use them to make broccoli ‘rice’, broccoli slaw, broccoli noodles, broccoli pesto, or simply use as you would the florets!

Cabbage – green
Cabbage – green

The green cabbage has a slightly sweet, mild taste, that is very versatile. Its crisp texture makes it ideal for shredding into salads or coleslaws. It can also be cooked, making it delicious in stir-fries or soups.

Cabbage – red
Cabbage – red

Red cabbage has a deep purple colour from the rich pigments called anthocyanins, a type of antioxidant. Red cabbage has a mildly peppery and earthy taste and a delightful crunchy texture. Its essential in coleslaw and can also be braised, baked, sauted and recently has been a featured star in sauerkraut.

Carrots
Carrots

The carrot is a popular and very versatile vegetable. It is also a great source of vitamins, minerals, dietary fibre and antioxidant compounds. Carrots grow almost year round in NZ. They  are a great snack eaten raw and can also be served steamed, boiled, or roasted. The humble carrot can be carefully cut to offer its best texture for each use. For example, grate them for in baking, cut them into sticks for dipping, juliennes for stir fries, rounds for soups and stews, or even spiralise for a veggie noodle!

Cauliflower
Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a very versatile vegetable. It can be eaten raw or steamed, roasted, grilled, mashed, used to make ‘rice’ or added to a pizza base. Cauliflower has a very mild flavour and has become popular to use in recipes to reduce the carbohydrate content, such as added to mac n cheese, used to make ‘rice’ or as a substitute for chips in nachos, or added to pizza bases. 

Courgette
Courgette

Courgettes are mild tasting, and take on the flavour of whatever it's cooked with. This makes them a very versatile ingredient, that can be added to just about anything, from Bolognese and Lasagne, to tacos and curries. Slide, dice or shred them into soups, pasta dishes, salads, and even chocolate cake! You can bake it, sauté it, BBQ it and make it into spiralised noodles.

Spinach
Spinach

Spinach is not only a versatile ingredient, it's also a very nutrient-rich one. Raw spinach has a mild, slightly sweet taste that can be refreshing in salad, pesto, smoothies and dips. Its flavor becomes more robust and bitter when cooked, so it's best used in recipes with strong flavours such as lasagne, bolognese, frittata or mexican dishes such as enchiladas or chilli. Spinach is second on the Dirty Dozen list, so chooose organically grown whenever possible.

Agria Potatoes
Agria Potatoes

Agria potatoes are a well-loved, great all-round potato. They have a yellow flesh that is firm, yet smooth, with a mild and earthy flavour.  Agria potatoes are considered a floury potato, which means they are low in water content and high in starch, giving them a dry, delicate texture. This makes them best suited for baking, mashing, frying, and roasting.  They are particularly great for making into chips and wedges. If your family eats a lot of potatoes, choosing organic potatoes is a great way to avoid a variety of pesticides.

Apples
Apples

New Zealand has the ideal conditions and soil for growing some of the best apples in the world. This includes cool winters, warm spring, plenty of sun and little rain in the growing season. Our growers use sustainable organic growing practices to preserve and support the fertile soils and rivers while producing a crisp and flavourful apple.The most popular areas apples grow in NZ are Hawke's Bay, Nelson, and Central Otago.

Beetroot
Beetroot

This root vegetable has a slightly sweet and definitely earthy flavour. Beetroot are very versatile and packed with essential nutrients.  They can be eaten raw, grated into salads, spiralised into veggie noodles, or blended into dip. Roasted beetroot are popular as a side dish or added to salads. Beetroot also pairs well with chocolate, making a decadently rich chocolate cake. Beetroot leaves can be also be used as you would other dark leafy greens and are particularly delicious when sautéed. 

Broccoli
Broccoli

Broccoli has a long list of advantages, from its rich nutrient content and health benefits to its versatility in the kitchen. This cruciferous vegetable, easily claims superfood status, as a source of essential nutrients vitamins A, C, and K, minerals including calcium, potassium and iron, as well as antioxidants and a high fibre content. Broccoli can be eaten raw in salads, added to stir fries and pasta dishes, blended into soup, and even roasted into pure deliciousness. And don’t toss those broccoli stems! Use them to make broccoli ‘rice’, broccoli slaw, broccoli noodles, broccoli pesto, or simply use as you would the florets!

Cabbage – green
Cabbage – green

The green cabbage has a slightly sweet, mild taste, that is very versatile. Its crisp texture makes it ideal for shredding into salads or coleslaws. It can also be cooked, making it delicious in stir-fries or soups.

Cabbage – red
Cabbage – red

Red cabbage has a deep purple colour from the rich pigments called anthocyanins, a type of antioxidant. Red cabbage has a mildly peppery and earthy taste and a delightful crunchy texture. Its essential in coleslaw and can also be braised, baked, sauted and recently has been a featured star in sauerkraut.

Carrots
Carrots

The carrot is a popular and very versatile vegetable. It is also a great source of vitamins, minerals, dietary fibre and antioxidant compounds. Carrots grow almost year round in NZ. They  are a great snack eaten raw and can also be served steamed, boiled, or roasted. The humble carrot can be carefully cut to offer its best texture for each use. For example, grate them for in baking, cut them into sticks for dipping, juliennes for stir fries, rounds for soups and stews, or even spiralise for a veggie noodle!

Cauliflower
Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a very versatile vegetable. It can be eaten raw or steamed, roasted, grilled, mashed, used to make ‘rice’ or added to a pizza base. Cauliflower has a very mild flavour and has become popular to use in recipes to reduce the carbohydrate content, such as added to mac n cheese, used to make ‘rice’ or as a substitute for chips in nachos, or added to pizza bases. 

Chard
Chard

Chard is a green leafy vegetable with an earthy and mildly bitter taste when eaten raw. However, after cooking, their flavour is more mild and sweet and their texture more tender. To use, separate the leaves and stalks (but don’t throw these out!). Simply sauté the stalks first with garlic and spices, then add the leaves. The leaves and stalks can also be blanched and added to frittata, pie fillings, galette or curry.  Raw chopped chard can be added to stir fries, stews or soups. 

Feijoa
Feijoa

New Zealand has a love affair with feijoas. Maybe it’s the sweet and flowery scent or the abundance of these little green fruits in autumn. They have a unique flavour, one that is its very own. It can be described as a mix of guava, pineapple and pear, but everyone seems to have their own take on that. The tangy feijoa is most commonly eaten by slicing it in half and scooping it out with a spoon. With such abundance in autumn, they find their way into everything from crumble, cake, slice, tart, loaf, muffins, jam, conserve to salsa and dressings.  

Kiwifruit – green
Kiwifruit – green

The classic green kiwifruit has a fuzzy skin and a tangy, sweet flavour, and has long been a healthy, tasty snack. It contains a natural enzyme unique to kiwifruit - actinidin, making it a great meat tenderizer, perfect for adding to marinades. Add green kiwifruit to smoothies, parfait or as a granola topper for a boost of  vitamin C. 

Royal Gala Apples
Royal Gala Apples

The Royal Gala is one of the world’s most popular apples. Did you know it was born and bredhere in New Zealand in the 1930s?!  It is a cross between a Golden Delicious and a Kidd’s Orange Red apple. It gained the name ‘Royal Gala’ as it has more bright red colouring than the gala apple. The Royal Gala Apple is crisp, sweet and juicy, with firm white flesh and a satisfying crunch. It’s the perfect snacking apple but also well suited for salads, desserts, savoury cooking and juicing. 

Spinach
Spinach

Spinach is not only a versatile ingredient, it's also a very nutrient-rich one. Raw spinach has a mild, slightly sweet taste that can be refreshing in salad, pesto, smoothies and dips. Its flavor becomes more robust and bitter when cooked, so it's best used in recipes with strong flavours such as lasagne, bolognese, frittata or mexican dishes such as enchiladas or chilli. Spinach is second on the Dirty Dozen list, so chooose organically grown whenever possible.

Agria Potatoes
Agria Potatoes

Agria potatoes are a well-loved, great all-round potato. They have a yellow flesh that is firm, yet smooth, with a mild and earthy flavour.  Agria potatoes are considered a floury potato, which means they are low in water content and high in starch, giving them a dry, delicate texture. This makes them best suited for baking, mashing, frying, and roasting.  They are particularly great for making into chips and wedges. If your family eats a lot of potatoes, choosing organic potatoes is a great way to avoid a variety of pesticides.

Beetroot
Beetroot

This root vegetable has a slightly sweet and definitely earthy flavour. Beetroot are very versatile and packed with essential nutrients.  They can be eaten raw, grated into salads, spiralised into veggie noodles, or blended into dip. Roasted beetroot are popular as a side dish or added to salads. Beetroot also pairs well with chocolate, making a decadently rich chocolate cake. Beetroot leaves can be also be used as you would other dark leafy greens and are particularly delicious when sautéed. 

Broccoli
Broccoli

Broccoli has a long list of advantages, from its rich nutrient content and health benefits to its versatility in the kitchen. This cruciferous vegetable, easily claims superfood status, as a source of essential nutrients vitamins A, C, and K, minerals including calcium, potassium and iron, as well as antioxidants and a high fibre content. Broccoli can be eaten raw in salads, added to stir fries and pasta dishes, blended into soup, and even roasted into pure deliciousness. And don’t toss those broccoli stems! Use them to make broccoli ‘rice’, broccoli slaw, broccoli noodles, broccoli pesto, or simply use as you would the florets!

Cabbage – green
Cabbage – green

The green cabbage has a slightly sweet, mild taste, that is very versatile. Its crisp texture makes it ideal for shredding into salads or coleslaws. It can also be cooked, making it delicious in stir-fries or soups.

Cabbage – red
Cabbage – red

Red cabbage has a deep purple colour from the rich pigments called anthocyanins, a type of antioxidant. Red cabbage has a mildly peppery and earthy taste and a delightful crunchy texture. Its essential in coleslaw and can also be braised, baked, sauted and recently has been a featured star in sauerkraut.

Carrots
Carrots

The carrot is a popular and very versatile vegetable. It is also a great source of vitamins, minerals, dietary fibre and antioxidant compounds. Carrots grow almost year round in NZ. They  are a great snack eaten raw and can also be served steamed, boiled, or roasted. The humble carrot can be carefully cut to offer its best texture for each use. For example, grate them for in baking, cut them into sticks for dipping, juliennes for stir fries, rounds for soups and stews, or even spiralise for a veggie noodle!

Cauliflower
Cauliflower

Cauliflower is a very versatile vegetable. It can be eaten raw or steamed, roasted, grilled, mashed, used to make ‘rice’ or added to a pizza base. Cauliflower has a very mild flavour and has become popular to use in recipes to reduce the carbohydrate content, such as added to mac n cheese, used to make ‘rice’ or as a substitute for chips in nachos, or added to pizza bases. 

Chard
Chard

Chard is a green leafy vegetable with an earthy and mildly bitter taste when eaten raw. However, after cooking, their flavour is more mild and sweet and their texture more tender. To use, separate the leaves and stalks (but don’t throw these out!). Simply sauté the stalks first with garlic and spices, then add the leaves. The leaves and stalks can also be blanched and added to frittata, pie fillings, galette or curry.  Raw chopped chard can be added to stir fries, stews or soups. 

Kiwifruit – green
Kiwifruit – green

The classic green kiwifruit has a fuzzy skin and a tangy, sweet flavour, and has long been a healthy, tasty snack. It contains a natural enzyme unique to kiwifruit - actinidin, making it a great meat tenderizer, perfect for adding to marinades. Add green kiwifruit to smoothies, parfait or as a granola topper for a boost of  vitamin C. 

Kiwifruit – yellow
Kiwifruit – yellow

The yellow kiwifruit is a newer variety of kiwi, with smooth skin and a sweeter, almost tropical flavour. Simply cut it in half and scoop out the inside for a sweet snack. The skin is also edible (make sure its organic!), so you can eat it whole or slice it for beautiful presentation. You will know it’s ripe, when it is slightly soft to touch. Did you know kiwifruit is packed with vitamin C, antioxidants and dietary fibre?!

Spinach
Spinach

Spinach is not only a versatile ingredient, it's also a very nutrient-rich one. Raw spinach has a mild, slightly sweet taste that can be refreshing in salad, pesto, smoothies and dips. Its flavor becomes more robust and bitter when cooked, so it's best used in recipes with strong flavours such as lasagne, bolognese, frittata or mexican dishes such as enchiladas or chilli. Spinach is second on the Dirty Dozen list, so chooose organically grown whenever possible.